Overcoming Sin through Christ: Lawlessness

 

Overcoming Sin through Christ

A Comprehensive List of Sins

(Alphabetically Arranged)

Richard Hollerman

The plan of this study is simple.  We will look at a large number of sins, one by one, alphabetically.  We will define the sin, describe it, and comment on it, along with noticing Scripture references on the particular entry.  Some illustrations will be offered along with the description.

Lawlessness

The plan of this study is simple.  We will look at a large number of sins, one by one, alphabetically.  We will define the sin, describe it, and comment on it, along with noticing Scripture references on the particular entry.  Some illustrations will be offered along with the description.

The Lord Jesus declared, “Not everyone who says to Me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ will enter the kingdom of heaven, but he who does the will of My Father who is in heaven. . . . And then I will declare to them, I never knew you; depart from Me, you who practice lawlessness’” (Matthew 7:21, 23).  The lawless person will be sent to hell.  This shows how vital it is that we avoid this sin!  The word here is anomian, meaning lawlessness, violation of law, iniquity, sin.  Anomos means lawless, without law, not subject to law, violating law.[1][1]

Lawlessness is actually another name for sin.  This is why we can read: “Everyone who practices sin also practices lawlessness; and sin is lawlessness” (1 John 3:4).  Here it is a reference to the moral law of God, not to the Law of Moses, with its 613 different minute laws given to Israel.  When we sin, we commit lawlessness since we violate God’s law and choose our own way.  Even the Law of God given through Moses had a purpose in condemning “those who are lawless and rebellious” and other sinners (1 Timothy 1:8-9).  As externally “righteous” as the Pharisees were, Jesus accused them of being “full of hypocrisy and lawlessness” in their heart (Matthew 23:28).

The consequences of lawlessness are great.  Jesus said that He would “send forth His angels, and they will gather out of His kingdom all stumbling blocks, and those who commit lawlessness, and will throw them into the furnace of life; in that place there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth” (Matthew 13:41-42).  In other words, the lawless will be sent to hell!

How vital that we be rescued from lawlessness in order to be forgiven.  Paul writes that Christ Jesus “gave Himself for us to redeem us from every lawless deed, and to purify for Himself a people for His own possession, zealous for good deeds” (Titus 2:14).  We must be rescued from sin or lawless deeds and begin to live for good and righteous deeds.  Paul says that in baptism one is saved from his past sin and the condemnation of his lawlessness for he becomes a “slave” of God: “Just as you presented your members as slaves to impurity and to lawlessness, resulting in further lawlessness, so now present your members as slaves to righteousness, resulting in sanctification” (Romans 6:19).  Again we see a contrast: we renounce impurity and lawlessness and we strive for righteousness and holiness.  When one is forgiven of his lawless deeds, he is assured of full forgiveness.

God promises, “Their sins and their lawless deeds I will remember no more” (Hebrews 10:17).  This is encouraging to us for if lawless deeds or sins drag us down to destruction, it is blessed to know that God will not hold us accountable for such lawlessness.  In fact, David says, “Blessed are those whose lawless deeds have been forgiven, and whose sins have been covered.  Blessed is the man whose sin the LORD will not take into account” (Romans 4:7-8).  We are so separated from living a lawless life that Paul could ask, “What partnership have righteousness and lawlessness, or what fellowship has light with darkness?” (2 Corinthians 6:14).  Lawlessness and darkness are in our past; now we live in righteousness and dwell in the light!

 

[1][1] Mounce and Mounce, Greek and English Interlinear New Testament.

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