What Can the Christian Do?

 

What Can the Christian Do?

(Short version: 200 words)

Today “Ban on Gay Marriage is Rejected” (Feb. 27, 2014) states that Arizona Governor Brewer vetoed a bill “that would have given business owners the right to refuse service to gay men, lesbians and other people on religious grounds.”

On the one hand, it shouldn’t be legal for a business owner to refuse to sell shoes, food, or clothes to a sodomite any more than it should be legal to deny such selling to an adulterer, fornicator, or pedophile. Why should the Christian’s conscience be hurt by such business activity?

On the other hand, the “the bill [allowing religious freedom] was inspired by incidents in other states in which florists, photographers and bakers were sued for refusing to cater to same-sex couples.” Is it right for state law to forbid a Christian to do right? How can a Christian approve, support, encourage, or further an immoral relationship of people engaged in sexual perversion? God says, “Keep yourself free from sin” (1 Timothy 5:22).

Arizona seems to want to limit the Christian’s freedom to carry out his God-given right to refuse to do wrong and to do the right. Civil law must not infringe on the Christian’s right to obey God.

What Can the Christian Do?

(Long version: 324 words)

One of today’s front-page articles brings up an important issue. It is entitled, “Ban on Gay Marriage is Rejected” (Feb. 27, 2014). The article refers to Arizona Governor Jan Brewer’s veto of a bill “that would have given business owners the right to refuse service to gay men, lesbians and other people on religious grounds.”

There are two issues here and they must not be confused. On the one hand, it shouldn’t be legal for a business owner to refuse to sell shoes, food, or clothes to a sodomite any more than it should be legal for a person to deny such a transaction to an adulterer, fornicator, or pedophile. Why should the Christian’s conscience be hurt by such business activity?

On the other hand, the article says that “the bill [to allow religious objections] was inspired by incidents in other states in which florists, photographers and bakers were sued for refusing to cater to same-sex couples.” This suggests that it is right for the law to forbid a Christian from exercising his freedom of religion. How can a Christian in any way approve of, support, encourage, or further an immoral relationship of two people engaged in perverse activity?

To broaden this issue, how can a Christian physician prescribe an abortion for a person who wants to murder her unborn baby? How could a pharmacist fill a prescription for a mother who wishes to abort her child? How can a Christian store owner sell condoms to unmarried people who wish to commit fornication? How could a person with rental property rent a room to two sodomites who wish to commit sexual immorality? How could a clerk sell pornography, liquor, tobacco, or junk food to others?

Arizona seems to want to limit the Christian’s freedom to carry out his or her God-given right to refuse to do wrong and to do the right. Civil law must not infringe on the Christian’s right to obey God.

–Richard Hollerman

 

 

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