Quiz6: Do You Know the Gospels

 

QUIZ 6

Do You Know the Gospels?

The four Gospels (Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John) are a unique portion of Scripture, intended for our enlightenment and edification. They were written to stimulate our faith, to instruct us in the teachings of Christ, and to reveal His divine glory. Within these books we are informed of Christ’s presence in the beginning, His virgin birth, His life, His teachings, His miracles, and His marvelous character. Of primary interest is His suffering, death, resurrection, and ascension to the Father in heaven. The last week of Christ’s life and His resurrection appearances occupy between one-fourth and one-half of these priceless books. But how well do you know the authors of these Gospel writings and how well do we know their contents? Test yourself with this quiz. Let this exercise increase your own desire to read and study these wondrous writings to your own spiritual blessing! Simply underline the correct gospel from the four listed.

(1) The author of this Gospel was a tax collector (publican) before Jesus called Him.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(2) The author of this Gospel was called “the beloved physician.”

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(3) This Gospel was written by the son of Mary of Jerusalem.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(4) The author of this Gospel was called “the disciple whom Jesus loved.”

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(5) The writer of this Gospel was a relative of Barnabas, Paul’s fellow-traveler and preacher.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(6) The author of this Gospel had been a disciple of John the baptizer before he became a disciple of Jesus.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(7) The writer of this Gospel was a companion of the apostle Paul on some of his journeys.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(8) This Gospel was written to Theophilus.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(9) This Gospel was written by a fisherman.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(10) This Gospel begins with the relationship of Christ with God “at the beginning.”

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(11) This Gospel begins with the birth of John the baptizer.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(12) This Gospel traces Jesus’ ancestry from Abraham to Joseph, the husband of Mary.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(13) This Gospel traces Jesus’ ancestry from Mary back to Adam.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(14) The writer of this Gospel describes 7 “signs” (or miracles) that attest to Jesus as the Son of God.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(15) This Gospel contains five (5) great discourses or teaching sections.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(16) This Gospel says that soldiers guarded the tomb of Jesus.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(17) This Gospel has a special sense of destiny, using such a phrase as “it is necessary.”

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(18) This Gospel begins with the preaching of John the baptizer.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(19) This Gospel concludes with Christ’s commission to His disciples, that those who believe the gospel and are baptized shall be saved, while those who disbelieve will be condemned.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(20) The apparent purpose of this Gospel was to win Jews to Jesus Christ by portraying Him as the Messiah, the Son of David, the King of the Jews.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(21) This Gospel contains no parables.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(22) This Gospel has the longest section of parables.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(23) In this Gospel, “Lord” is only once applied to Jesus before His resurrection.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(24) This Gospel uses the verb “believe” 98 times but the noun (belief/faith) not once.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(25) This Gospel has the longest account of the “Olivet Discourse” (the teaching about Jerusalem’s destruction and Christ’s return).

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(26) This Gospel gives the longest recorded prayer of Jesus.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(27) The writer of this Gospel takes a special interest in women.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(28) “Immediately” (or a synonym) occurs about 43-47 times in this Gospel, emphasizing Christ’s work rather than His words.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(29) This Gospel emphasizes the person and nature of Jesus Christ and the importance of faith in Him.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(30) This Gospel devotes an entire chapter to Christ’s denunciation of the Pharisees.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(31) This Gospel includes four “hymns”–that of Mary, Zacharias, the angels, and Simeon.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(32) This Gospel presents the long “upper room discourse” (or discussion and teaching) prior to Jesus’ arrest.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(33) This Gospel records the visit of the magi after Christ’s birth and Herod’s murder of the Bethlehem babies.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(34) This Gospel has much to say about poverty and wealth.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(35) This Gospel records that Jesus washed the disciples’ feet in the upper room.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(36) This Gospel describes Jesus’ appearance to Mary Magdalene near the tomb after His resurrection.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(37) This Gospel writer sees no need to explain Jewish customs.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(38) This Gospel does not mention the institution of the Lord’s supper (communion).

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(39) This Gospel has an unusual interest in medical matters.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(40) The Sermon on the Mount (covering three chapters) is found in this Gospel.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(41) The perspective, arrangement, and content of this Gospel is quite unlike the others.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(42) This Gospel says that a brother who will not confess his sin and be reconciled must be treated as a Gentile and tax-gatherer (publican).

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(43) One emphasis of this Gospel is that Jesus was a physical human being (as well as divine).

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(44) This Gospel is generally thought to be the last one written.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(45) This Gospel describes Jesus’ conversation with a woman at a Samaritan well.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(46) This Gospel has the longest account of Christ’s “limited commission” to the apostles (i.e., He limited the preaching to the Jews).

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(47) This Gospel describes Jesus’ appearance to some of the apostles along the Sea of Galilee after His resurrection.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(48) Important terms in this Gospel are light, darkness, witness, love, abide, life, word, and glory.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(49) This Gospel says that Jesus’ followers are to baptize into the name of the Father, and the Son, and the Holy Spirit.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(50) This Gospel stresses Christ’s Judean ministry rather than His Galilean ministry.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(51) This Gospel reveals that Jesus raised Lazarus from the dead.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(52) This Gospel emphasizes the subject of prayer.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(53) This Gospel says that Christ will build His assembly (church) on a rock.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(54) Unlike the other Gospels, this one does not record the temptation of Christ, the transfiguration, the ascension, the virgin birth, Jesus’ youth, or His trial before the Sanhedrin (Jewish council).

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(55) This Gospel often uses “the kingdom of heaven” while the others use “the kingdom of God.”

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(56) This Gospel tells us much more about Christ’s ministry in Perea (east of the Jordan) than the other Gospels.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(57) This Gospel emphasizes the fulfillment of Old Testament prophecies and contains at least 47 Old Testament quotations.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(58) This Gospel contains Jesus’ parables about the lost coin, the lost sheep, and the lost son (prodigal son).

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(59) This Gospel has the fewest chapters.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(60) This Gospel has the most chapters.

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

(61) This Gospel is the longest (in pages).

(a) Matthew (b) Mark (c) Luke (d) John

 

Click Here for Answers

Comments are closed.